Ethos

Responsibility

As architects, we have a responsibility to fulfill the aspirations of our clients, and to consider the potential impact of our designs on our natural and social environments.

Rebuilding an Icon

On August 29, 2005, the worst natural disaster in U.S. history, Hurricane Katrina, brought New Orleans to its knees. The effects of this devastating storm were personified by the damage inflicted upon the city’s largest, most recognizable icon, the Superdome. It came to serve as a “Refuge of Last Resort” providing shelter for more than 30,000 New Orleans citizens for six long days. Ultimately the Superdome is responsible for saving the lives of countless New Orleanians.

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Refuge of Last Resort

The restoration of the Superdome was an unprecedented endeavor into structural ingenuity. At a total cost of $336 million, the project was a testament to the determination, willpower and dedication of all the individuals involved. The $32 million roof job—billed as the world’s largest—was completed in the 144 days, nearly 40 days ahead of schedule. The stadium went from Katrina’s destruction to “football ready” in only 13 months.

A Common Purpose

In the wake of tragedy, a broad coalition—including the Superdome staff, State of Louisiana, NFL, New Orleans Saints, and construction crews—came together to accomplish one goal: to open the Superdome with a Saints football game on September 26, 2006. At the peak of construction, there were over 850 people working tirelessly around the clock. The rebuilding effort signaled to the world that the New Orleans recovery was underway.

A Soulful Revival

On September 25, 2006, a sellout crowd witnessed the New Orleans Saints’ “homecoming” triumph over the Atlanta Falcons 23-3 on ESPN’s Monday Night Football.  It was the Superdome’s post-Katrina debut, and one of the most emotionally powerful games in NFL history. Steve Gleason’s blocked punt resulted in a touchdown, and showed the world we were back. Against the odds, the Superdome has reclaimed status as a world-class venue for sports and entertainment.

Rebuilding an Icon

On August 29, 2005, the worst natural disaster in U.S. history, Hurricane Katrina, brought New Orleans to its knees. The effects of this devastating storm were personified by the damage inflicted upon the city’s largest, most recognizable icon, the Superdome. It came to serve as a “Refuge of Last Resort” providing shelter for more than 30,000 New Orleans citizens for six long days. Ultimately the Superdome is responsible for saving the lives of countless New Orleanians.

  • Open story
Rebuilding an Icon

On August 29, 2005, the worst natural disaster in U.S. history, Hurricane Katrina, brought New Orleans to its knees. The effects of this devastating storm were personified by the damage inflicted upon the city’s largest, most recognizable icon, the Superdome. It came to serve as a “Refuge of Last Resort” providing shelter for more than 30,000 New Orleans citizens for six long days. Ultimately the Superdome is responsible for saving the lives of countless New Orleanians.

  • Open story
A Conservation Legacy at Fundo Tic Toc

When it became necessary for the late Doug Tompkins, founder of North Face, to consider the future of his generous contribution to Chile’s conservation network he sought out Trey Trahan to inherit the stewardship of both the land and his ideals. He operated under the belief that humans have an ethical obligation to share the planet with other species, and that we must reorient our values and activities so that all forms of life can flourish.

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A Conservation Legacy at Fundo Tic Toc

When it became necessary for the late Doug Tompkins, founder of North Face, to consider the future of his generous contribution to Chile’s conservation network he sought out Trey Trahan to inherit the stewardship of both the land and his ideals. He operated under the belief that humans have an ethical obligation to share the planet with other species, and that we must reorient our values and activities so that all forms of life can flourish.

  • Open story
A Conservation Legacy at Fundo Tic Toc

When it became necessary for the late Doug Tompkins, founder of North Face, to consider the future of his generous contribution to Chile’s conservation network he sought out Trey Trahan to inherit the stewardship of both the land and his ideals. He operated under the belief that humans have an ethical obligation to share the planet with other species, and that we must reorient our values and activities so that all forms of life can flourish.

  • Open story

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