Ethos

Materiality

How does an idea translate into material form? Materiality gives a building character—it imbues it with weight and texture, and determines how it will age and patina. Our choice of each material evolves out of our study of its physical behaviors, and the sensations it evokes, creating a tactile map of the thought and process that goes into our designs.

States of Glass

Glass can create unimpeded vistas or alter our perception of the world around us. We are judicious in deploying what is essentially a liquid material. Whether cast to create a permanent ice sculpture, or channeled to insulate and blur-glass is an ephemeral material imbued with meaning.

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States of Glass

Glass can create unimpeded vistas or alter our perception of the world around us. We are judicious in deploying what is essentially a liquid material. Whether cast to create a permanent ice sculpture, or channeled to insulate and blur-glass is an ephemeral material imbued with meaning.

  • Open story
States of Glass

Glass can create unimpeded vistas or alter our perception of the world around us. We are judicious in deploying what is essentially a liquid material. Whether cast to create a permanent ice sculpture, or channeled to insulate and blur-glass is an ephemeral material imbued with meaning.

  • Open story
Formed Concrete

We allow concrete to express the physicality of its forming process. Linear boards stratify resolute mass. Cast in place forms give way to monolithic thoughts. Light playing on the surface can pillow or soften this material. It conveys a sense of longevity-something that will last beyond our time.

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Formed Concrete

We allow concrete to express the physicality of its forming process. Linear boards stratify resolute mass. Cast in place forms give way to monolithic thoughts. Light playing on the surface can pillow or soften this material. It conveys a sense of longevity-something that will last beyond our time.

  • Open story
Formed Concrete

We allow concrete to express the physicality of its forming process. Linear boards stratify resolute mass. Cast in place forms give way to monolithic thoughts. Light playing on the surface can pillow or soften this material. It conveys a sense of longevity-something that will last beyond our time.

  • Open story
Masonry Restoration

The first phase of the Magazine Street Residence project was comprised of restoring the historic masonry on site through a detailed, multi-step process. First, a series of stainless steel helical ties were installed in an approximate 18″ x 18″ diagonal grid in all existing walls. Then, a compatible fill material was injected into each wall filling all voids and cracks in order to create a monolithic, structurally stabilized wall. Next, selective tuck pointing and brick repair was done and all graffiti paint was removed. Finally, a rising damp course was installed in order to finish work on the walls. This process will stop the erosion and deterioration process and thusly restore the walls to their original structural integrity for many years to come.

Read more about Responsibility, Materiality
Masonry Restoration

The first phase of the Magazine Street Residence project was comprised of restoring the historic masonry on site through a detailed, multi-step process. First, a series of stainless steel helical ties were installed in an approximate 18″ x 18″ diagonal grid in all existing walls. Then, a compatible fill material was injected into each wall filling all voids and cracks in order to create a monolithic, structurally stabilized wall. Next, selective tuck pointing and brick repair was done and all graffiti paint was removed. Finally, a rising damp course was installed in order to finish work on the walls. This process will stop the erosion and deterioration process and thusly restore the walls to their original structural integrity for many years to come.

  • Open story
Masonry Restoration

The first phase of the Magazine Street Residence project was comprised of restoring the historic masonry on site through a detailed, multi-step process. First, a series of stainless steel helical ties were installed in an approximate 18″ x 18″ diagonal grid in all existing walls. Then, a compatible fill material was injected into each wall filling all voids and cracks in order to create a monolithic, structurally stabilized wall. Next, selective tuck pointing and brick repair was done and all graffiti paint was removed. Finally, a rising damp course was installed in order to finish work on the walls. This process will stop the erosion and deterioration process and thusly restore the walls to their original structural integrity for many years to come.

  • Open story
Weathered Steel

Comprised entirely of 5 weathered steel plates, the Laguna Gloria Pavilions blend in with the surrounding landscape. The scratches and scarring of the steel plates will continue to age over time and become not only part of the art, but also serve as a canvas for the larger Sculpture Garden. Each façade is akin to a painting that will map the conditions of the site over time. The delicacy of the steel’s appearance and heaviness of the material, matches the careful balance of the garden’s natural environment and the art that lives in it.

Construction Process

Designed as an assemblage of framing devices, the buildings of the new arrival garden integrate themselves with the adjacent landscape providing a cohesive experience for visitors to the site. Constructed out of 1-3/4” solid weathering steel plates, which act as the structure of the buildings and weather-proof enclosures, the new pavilion buildings take cues from minimalist sculptors and artists Richard Serra, Jorge Oteiza and Donald Judd. The Architects worked closely with the steel fabricator and suppliers to specify raw mill scale finish for the weathered steel walls. This was done to showcase the resultant of the hot rolling process forming the steel plates. The walls are the primary structure of the buildings and weather enclosure and waterproofing, a combination not commonly used in construction.

Weathered Steel

Comprised entirely of 5 weathered steel plates, the Laguna Gloria Pavilions blend in with the surrounding landscape. The scratches and scarring of the steel plates will continue to age over time and become not only part of the art, but also serve as a canvas for the larger Sculpture Garden. Each façade is akin to a painting that will map the conditions of the site over time. The delicacy of the steel’s appearance and heaviness of the material, matches the careful balance of the garden’s natural environment and the art that lives in it.

  • Open story
Weathered Steel

Comprised entirely of 5 weathered steel plates, the Laguna Gloria Pavilions blend in with the surrounding landscape. The scratches and scarring of the steel plates will continue to age over time and become not only part of the art, but also serve as a canvas for the larger Sculpture Garden. Each façade is akin to a painting that will map the conditions of the site over time. The delicacy of the steel’s appearance and heaviness of the material, matches the careful balance of the garden’s natural environment and the art that lives in it.

  • Open story
Yakisugi

The ancient Japanese technique called Shou Sugi Ban, also known as Yakisugi, is the charring of the wood surface which creates a waterproof layer and a natural resistance to rot, insects, and decay. The unique texture of the wood allows for a flexibility of design in its utilization. From backdrop to façade, the material both blends within its environment or invokes a bold iconic appearance.

Read more about Materiality, Artistry
Yakisugi in Design

We make an effort to use this heat treated wood in our designs when possible. Two examples include the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum at the National Arboretum and College Station Boutique Hotel.

For our National Bonsai project, the architectural system is comprised of Shou Sugi Ban charred wood columns and trellis, free standing concrete planes, and purposeful encapsulation of the landscape.

For College Station Boutique Hotel, we proposed this process to create a unique texture and expression for the building which pays tribute to the university’s annual bonfire, acknowledging the project’s local context and community.

Yakisugi

The ancient Japanese technique called Shou Sugi Ban, also known as Yakisugi, is the charring of the wood surface which creates a waterproof layer and a natural resistance to rot, insects, and decay. The unique texture of the wood allows for a flexibility of design in its utilization. From backdrop to façade, the material both blends within its environment or invokes a bold iconic appearance.

  • Open story
Yakisugi

The ancient Japanese technique called Shou Sugi Ban, also known as Yakisugi, is the charring of the wood surface which creates a waterproof layer and a natural resistance to rot, insects, and decay. The unique texture of the wood allows for a flexibility of design in its utilization. From backdrop to façade, the material both blends within its environment or invokes a bold iconic appearance.

  • Open story

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